Have the Oceans Had Enough? Largest Carbon Sink May Be Slowing Down

More than half of the CO2 emitted by human activities each year are taken up by natural carbon sinks, on land and in the ocean. However, recent studies suggest that anthropogenic emissions may be outpacing the ocean’s ability to take up CO2.
Le Quéré et al. (2009) constructed a global CO2 budget for 1959 – 2008 [...]

Altering the Abyss: Deep-Sea Ecosystems Affected By Climate Change

The abyssal plains, regions of the ocean below 2000 meters, cover 60% of the Earth’s surface. Scientists have long believed that the ecosystems located at these depths are relatively isolated and stable, immune to the dramatic changes rocking shallower ocean regions due to global warming. However, a recent paper* by Ken Smith, a marine ecologist [...]

Project Surya Aims to Clear the Air and Reduce Global Warming

Welcome to Blog Action Day 2009! Starting early this morning in the Far East until late tonight in the Pacific Islands, more than 8,700 bloggers from 148 countries are stimulating a global conversation about many aspects of climate change. For me, the choice was easy – I write about science, so of course I’ll blog [...]

Up in Smoke: Black Carbon’s Role in Climate Change

[Update: I am moving to a once-a-week blog post.  Check here each Tuesday for a brand new entry of Brave Blue Words!]
The most significant anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) is carbon dioxide, CO2. Comprehensive reductions in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 (expressed as “parts per million or ppm) are the only way to bring down global [...]

The Other Climate Changers: Why Black Carbon and Ozone Also Matter

The Other Climate Changers | Foreign Affairs
By Jessica Seddon Wallack and Veerabhadran Ramanathan

Summary — Most initiatives to slow global warming involve reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Little attention has been given to reducing emissions of the light-absorbing particles known as “black carbon” or the gases that form ozone–even though doing so would be easier and cheaper [...]

Still Rising After All These Years: CO2 Levels Increase for 51st Straight Year

Atmospheric CO2 reached 387.81 parts per million (ppm) in July 2009 up from 386.38ppm this time last year according to data released by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) earlier this month. Atmospheric CO2 has been rising since Charles Keeling started taking measurements with high precision instruments at the remote Mauna Loa Observatory in 1958. [...]