Have the Oceans Had Enough? Largest Carbon Sink May Be Slowing Down

More than half of the CO2 emitted by human activities each year are taken up by natural carbon sinks, on land and in the ocean. However, recent studies suggest that anthropogenic emissions may be outpacing the ocean’s ability to take up CO2.
Le Quéré et al. (2009) constructed a global CO2 budget for 1959 – 2008 [...]

Fishing For Answers: Connecting Ocean and Human Health

Walking home from an early appointment this morning, I considered what to write about for today’s blog post. An article about marine ecosystems and fisheries caught my eye yesterday. While intrigued, I was also reluctant – fisheries management is one subject that both interests and frustrates the hell out of me. I took one class [...]

Global Warming Warps Marine Food Webs

(I’m working hard on my fiction writing so I’m taking a bit of a break from the blog. Just another few days and then I’ll be back with more original content, promise! For now, here’s an interesting story reposted from ScienceNOW Daily News)
By Erik Stokstad
ScienceNOW Daily News
26 August 2009
Teasing apart the complex ways in which [...]

Global Warming Bubbles up from the Deep

European scientists have discovered more than 250 plumes of methane (CH4) gas bubbles rising from the seabed of the West Spitsbergen continental margin in the Arctic, at a depth of 150 to 400 meters. The warming of Arctic currents by 1° over the last 30 years has triggered the release of methane, a potent [...]

Ocean acidification: the “other carbon problem” – now at a theater near you!

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, the oceans have acted as a big sink, absorbing 30% of the CO2 that has been pumped into the atmosphere at a rate of 22 million tons a day. That would seem like good news; less atmospheric CO2 means less warming. But there’s a catch: the CO2 doesn’t [...]